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International Cultivar Authority Registry Of The Genus Viola

SECTION I a.
Traditional Single Flowered Violets

R
Ravegeot - Russian Superb


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Ravageot - See 'Grosse' Bleue'.


Rawson's White - Raised by the Reverend Arthur Rawson of Bromley in Kent.

The Rev Rawson was a leading amateur horticulturalist in the latter part of the 19th century.  It was introduced by Henry Cannell and Sons of Swanley  ( Kent)  in 1888.  Ivory white flowers which are small and delicate, with a good scent and neat fresh green foliage, very free flowering especially during the Spring months, looking its best in the rock garden where it develops into a very neat compact plant, though should never be grown under glass, as it hates this kind of treatment.


Red Charm - Origins unknown.

Fragrant red flowers


Red Lion -  Origins unknown.

Magenta flowers which fade to a lightish-pink as the season advances and a delicate perfume are the characteristics of this lovely violet, which in recent years would seem to have arrived here from both the U.S.A. and Australia.


Red Russian - Origins unknown, c 1925.

The deepest red violet flowering throughout the winter.


Red Queen -  Origins unknown.

Deep-rose flowers with a strong perfume.


Reids Crimson Carpet –  John Whitlesey, Canyon Creek Nursery, Oroville (California) USA, 1998.

A compact plant with tidy deep green foliage.  It produces brilliant crimson flowers giving out a lovely scent.

Named after John’s son Reid .


Reine Augustine - See 'Kaiserin Augusta'.


Reine des Agenais - Pierre Barandou, (Agen) France.  Date unknown.

A variegated form of 'Reine Charlotte'.


Reine Victoria - See 'Czar Bleu'.


Reise von Botnang - Origins unknown, 1930.

No description available.


Riviera Violet - See 'Saint Helena'.


Rochelle - Introduced by Edith Pawla, Capitola (California) U.S.A.   Date unknown.

Small, fragrant pink flowers which are very prolific and scented.


Rohrbach's Everblooming - Origins unknown.

Fragrant purple flowers.


Rosea Delicatissima - Armand Millet, Bourg la Reine, France.  1914.

No description available.


Rose Madder – Bernwode Plants (Buckinghamshire) U.K.

A new seedling of V. odorata  with large scented flowers of a soft pale pink.


Rose Perle - See 'Perle Rose'.


Rosine - Origins unknown.

A selection reputedly from V. odorata rosina or rosine as it is sometimes known, which is an early pink flowered violet with a very sweet perfume; the flowers are larger than 'Coeur d'Alsace,’ hardy and very free flowering. This variety needs a little fussing to produce its best although when it does the results are well worth- having. A good violet for growing in a pot.


Rote Ungarin - Eastern Germany.

Small deep red flowers.


Roter Ungar - See 'Rote Ungarin'.


Royal Elk - Edith Pawla, Capitola (Califoria) USA, 1947.

“A monarch in a purple robe” is how this violet was described by its developer.  The blooms were supposed to be up to 2 inches across, carried on stems 9 - 12 inches in length.  Deep-purplish blue flowers, with a lovely perfume.  This violet was recently re-discovered by John Whitlesey (former president of the International Violet Association)  in a San Francisco garden.


Royal Robe - Edith Pawla, Capitola (California) USA.


Rubra - Origins unknown.

Reputedly a selection of the pink form of the common violet, with small flowers  that are sweetly scented.  A free flowering and a pretty addition to the rock garden. It was introduced by the distinguished French firm of Paillet of Chatenay around 1880, who were also responsible for the introduction of 'Belle de Chatenay'.


Russian, The - See 'London'.


Russian Superb - Origins unknown.

A profusely flowering violet that gives its best during spring, when it produces small purple scented flowers.  It can be something of an untidy plant if not kept well tended, as it has a propensity to produce an abundance of runners; it makes an interesting subject for the rock garden.  The name of this variety is rather strange given the size of the blooms.


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